creative explorations of real and imaginary futures

This international summit takes place at Dartington Hall in southwest England from 16.30 on November 9 to 16.30 on November 11, 2016.

Feeding the Insatiable (feedingtheinsatiable.info) features thinkers and creatives from across the world, with an opening keynote event from The Land Art Generator Initiative (Robert Ferry and Elizabeth Monoian) with ecoartist / producer Chris Fremantle from eco/art/scot/land. Ethnographer of Futures Laura Watts presents the second keynote on Day 2 of the summit. Other sessions focus on Ecologies, Shaping the World, Artist projects, Communicating, Energy Generation and Poetics.

Amongst the international stable of presenters are Cathy Fitzgerald an artist and Irish Green Party’s spokesperson on Forestry; David Haley who has written extensively on art and uncertainty; Beth Carruthers, one of the key art and sustainability theorists working with deep ecology approaches; Hannah Imlach a young artist from Scotland whose recent projects directly engage with renewables; Keynoter Laura Watts describes herself as a writer, poet, and ethnographer of futures – she is one of the authors of recently-published ebban an flowan along with Alec Finlay and Alistair Peebles; Ian Garrett is a key theorist and practitioner of sustainable design for theatre and behind Canada’s Center for Sustainable Practice in the Arts; and finally Loraine Leeson one of the foremost practitioners of socially engaged art in the UK, currently working with a group of geezers on renewables on the River Lee in East London.  And these are only some of the people presenting…

See more detail in the programme.

The summit encourages creative intervention and invention and new approaches to scientific narrative including the quirky, the impossible, the micro and the personal. It encourages debate – practical, philosophical, metaphysical, and theoretical – about how creative minds and creative spirit can be brought to bear on these issues. To date, scientific and technocratic evidence-based narratives have failed to change people’s behaviours or how they care for the planet they inhabit. These narratives fail despite their increasingly strident and panic-stricken tone: a new creativity is needed, a devising of new more affective and nuanced narratives. An important element in the shift in narrative we require to help us in communicating pressing environmental issues is beauty. Rarely are renewable energy generators (on whatever scale) made beautiful with aesthetic concerns subsumed by technical concerns. Renewables can potentially contribute to the public realm in more ways than reducing our need for carbon-based fuels.

Day 2 keynote speaker Laura Watts: writer, poet and ethnographer of futures.  Laura is  Associate Professor in Science and Technology Studies (STS) at IT University of Copenhagen. Her interest is in the effect of landscape on how the future is imagined and made in everyday practice. How might the future be made differently in different places? Over the last fifteen years, she has collaborated with industry and organisations in telecoms, public transport, and renewable energy, to re-imagine how the future gets made in high-tech industry, and how it might be made otherwise.

Laura Watts is a writer, poet, and ‘Ethnographer of Futures’, and Associate Professor in Science and Technology Studies at IT University of Copenhagen. Her work explores the effect of landscape and writing on how the future is imagined and made in everyday practice. How might the future be made differently in different places, and through different writing methods? How is the future imagined and made differently at the edge?

The Land Art Generator Initiative has become one of the world’s most followed sustainable design events and is inspiring people everywhere about the promise of a net-zero carbon future. LAGI is showing how innovation through interdisciplinary collaboration, culture, and the expanding role of technology in art can help to shape the aesthetic impact of renewable energy on our constructed and natural environments.

The goal of LAGI is to design and construct a series of large-scale site-specific public art installations that uniquely combine art with utility scale clean energy generation.

Composer Lola Perrin will give an opening performance which is in part been devised by and participated in by participants in the summit (more details to follow). Described as ‘hauntingly compelling’ (The Guardian) her music has been heard in concert halls across the world. You can hear more on her soundcloud page.

Feeding the Insatiable welcomes scientists, engineers, artists, philosophers, public policy-makers, influencers, and experts in public art from across the world. See our emerging map of participants.

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Art can change the world.  Artists have played an important part in every major social change in our society and have an indispensable role today in helping us deal with complex existential challenges.  But issues-laden art can be bombastic, unsubtle and lacking in spirit, particularly when artists insist they have a message to send. Renewable energy can change the world, too. But we don’t have to accept that only industrial scale installations are the answer.

The summit encourages creative intervention and invention and new approaches to scientific narrative including the quirky, the impossible, the micro and the personal. It encourages debate – practical, philosophical, metaphysical, and theoretical – about how creative minds and creative spirit can be brought to bear on these issues. To date, scientific and technocratic evidence-based narratives have failed to change our behaviours or how we care for the planet we all inhabit. These narratives fail despite their increasingly strident and panic-stricken tone: a new voice is needed, a more affective and nuanced narratives. An important element in the shift in narrative we require to help us in communicating pressing environmental issues is beauty. Rarely are renewable energy generators (on whatever scale) made beautiful with aesthetic concerns subsumed by technical concerns. Renewables can potentially contribute to the public realm in more ways than reducing our need for carbon-based fuels.

We explore ways in which creative makers and enquirers –– artists, scientists, philosophers, theorists and others –– can increasingly play a part in moving rather than cajoling, inspiring rather than scaring, succouring rather than scourging. The impassioned voice has an essential role to play in shifting the inert and entrenched thinking about how we live in the world, how we consume its resources and how we subvert and circumvent monolithic thinking. The danger lies not in those with abrasively negative views (as panic leads to stridency bordering on the absurd and numbers inevitably dwindle to irrelevancy under the growing weight of evidence), but those who have no views at all.  Flicking the switch is so utterly fundamental to our daily lives that we gasp with horror and puzzlement if it produces no effect.

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Feeding the Insatiable is produced by art.earth; principal partners are Schumacher College, and Regen SW.

 

Chloe Whipple: How to survive on 15 litres of water a day

Keynote speakers

Robert Ferry and Elizabeth Monoian of Land Art Generator Initiative

with Chris Fremantle of eco/arts/scot/land

The Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI), provides a platform for artists, architects, landscape architects, and other creatives working with engineers and scientists to bring forward human-centered solutions for sustainable energy infrastructures that enhance the city as works of public art while cleanly powering thousands of homes.

Eco/arts/scot/land is a platform for research and practice run by Chris Fremantle. It is an invaluable source of information for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers, and a generator of ideas and knowledge.

 

Laura Watts (IT University of Copenhagen): writer, poet and ethnographer of futures

Laura is a Writer, Poet, & Ethnographer, and Associate Professor in Science and Technology Studies (STS) at IT University of Copenhagen. Her interest is in the effect of landscape on how the future is imagined and made in everyday practice. How might the future be made differently in different places? Over the last fifteen years, she has collaborated with industry and organisations in telecoms, public transport, and renewable energy, to re-imagine how the future gets made in high-tech industry, and how it might be made otherwise.

 

 

ICE Art & Energy 200

During the summit we will launch the callout for the ICE Art & Energy prize, an engaging, clean energy generating, international art competition, led by Regen SW and the Institution of Civil Engineers.

The competition challenges outstanding artists and designers to collaborate with civil engineers to construct an iconic piece of public art that also generates energy at scale. The winning piece will be installed in a UK city by 2020.

 

Day 0: Research Day

During the day on November 9 an invited group of artists, engineers and others will meet to discuss issues around art and renewable energy, public art, ephemeral art, and how to foster closer ties between artists and industry. A summary of this day will be presented during the main summit, and a report published. This meeting will be led by Chris Fremantle, founder of ecoartscotland and is hosted by Schumacher College‘s arts and ecology programme

 

Organising Committee

Find out more

 

 

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About art.earth

art.earth is a family of artists and organisations whose work focusses on ecology and the natural world. Core members of the family are the Centre for Contemporary Art and the Natural World (CCANW) and research group Research in Art, Nature and Environment (RANE).

artdotearth CIC trades as art.earth and is a Community Interest Company registered in England & Wales Co. No. 10406009
Reg Office: 4 Coleridge House, Chillington, Kingsbridge, Devon TQ7 2JG UK
www.artdotearth.org | info@artdotearth.org

 

 

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